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II Serie Volume 33 Number 10
October 2020

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  1- Factors of recurrence of intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix.

2- Duodenoscopy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic pathology.

3- Mephedrone (?Meow Meow?), The New Designer Drug of Abuse: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynimics and Clinical and Forensic Issues

4- Natural history of fetal pyelocaliectasia.

5- Antidepressant drugs.

6- Erysipelas.

7- Pressure ulcer management--Evidence-based interventions.

8- Traumatic Brain Injury: Integrated Approach

9- Genital ulcers caused by sexually transmitted diseases: current therapies, diagnosis and their relevance in HIV pandemy.

10- Current management of gout.

11- Livedo vasculitis.

12- Tarlov's cyst: definition, etiopathogenesis, propaedeutic and treatment.

13- Antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated cystitis in non-pregnant women up to menopause.

14- Urolithiasis and renal colic. Therapeutic approach in urology.

15- Uterine inversion.

16- Surgical basic skills: surgical sutures.

17- Rhabdomyolysis.

18- Neuropathy diagnosis strategy.

19- Functional neuroanatomy. Cortical mapping in usual paradigm in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

20- Neuropathy diagnosis strategy.

 
   

Will the pandemic permanently alter scientific publishing?

The push for rapid and open publishing could take off — although financial pressures lie ahead: part 4 in a series on science after the pandemic.

The COVID-19 crisis has underlined just how fast and open science publishing can be — when scientists want it that way. Researchers working on the pandemic are sharing preliminary results on preprint servers and institutional websites at unprecedented rates, embracing the kind of early, public sharing that physicists and mathematicians have practised for decades. Journals have whisked manuscripts through to formal publication in record time, aided by researchers who have rapidly peer-reviewed the studies. And dozens of publishers and journals, including Elsevier, Springer Nature and the New England Journal of Medicine, have made coronavirus research — new and old — free to read. 

Full paper here (English only).